Somebody To Love

“Somebody to Love” is a song by the British rock band Queen, written by the lead singer/pianist Freddie Mercury. It debuted on the band’s 1976 album A Day at the Races and was also featured on their compilation album Greatest Hits.
The song offers listeners something similar to that of Queen’s earlier hit “Bohemian Rhapsody” with its complex harmonies and guitar solos; however instead of mimicking an English choir, the band turned to a gospel choir. It reached #2 in the UK and #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US. This song made it clear to fans that “Queen could swing as hard as it could rock, by channeling the spirit of gospel music.”

Sleigh Ride

“Sleigh Ride” is a popular light orchestral piece composed by Leroy Anderson. The composer had the original idea for the piece during a heat wave in July 1946 finished the work in February 1948. It was originally an instrumental piece; the lyrics, about a person who would like to ride in a sleigh on a winter’s day with another person, were written by Mitchell Parish in 1950. The orchestral version was first recorded in 1949 by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra. The melody of the main strain of the tune was used (with no credit for Anderson) as the main theme of Victor Young’s score for the 1949 western Streets of Laredo; it is notable that Mitchell Parrish worked with Young around this time, having recently written lyrics for Young’s version of Hoagy Carmichael’s previously instrumental number Stardust. Sleigh Ride was a hit record on RCA Victor Red Seal 49-0515 (45 rpm) / 10-1484 (78 rpm), and has become the equivalent of a signature song for the orchestra. The 45 rpm version was originally issued on red vinyl. The Pops has also recorded the song with John Williams, their conductor from 1979 to 1995, and Keith Lockhart, their current conductor. Over the years, the song has become a Christmas standard.

Pure Imagination

“Pure Imagination” is a song from the 1971 movie Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. It was written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley specifically for the movie. It was sung by Gene Wilder (Willy Wonka).

Over the Rainbow

“Over the Rainbow” (often referred to as “Somewhere over the Rainbow”) is a ballad, with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg. It was written for the movie The Wizard of Oz (1939) and was sung by actress Judy Garland, in her starring role as Dorothy Gale. The song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song and became Garland’s signature song, as well as one of the most enduring standards of the 20th century.

Oh, Holy Night

“O Holy Night” (French: Cantique de Noël) is a well-known Christmas carol composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem “Minuit, chrétiens” (Midnight, Christians) by a wine merchant and poet, Placide Cappeau (1808–1877).

New York State of Mind

“New York State of Mind” is a song written by Billy Joel which initially appeared on the album Turnstiles in 1976. Although it was never a hit song and was never released as a single, it has become a fan favorite and a song that Joel plays regularly in concert. Joel famously played the song at The Concert for New York City, the October 2001 benefit concert for the New York City Fire and Police Departments and the loved ones of families of first responders lost during the terrorist attack on New York City on 9/11. He reprised that theme, playing it during his set at 12-12-12: The Concert for Sandy Relief at Madison Square Garden in New York City on December 12, 2012, where he changed lyrics to include the likes of “Breezy Point.”

Super Mario

Super Mario is a series of platform video games created by Nintendo featuring their mascot, Mario. Alternatively called the Super Mario Bros. At least one Super Mario game has been released for every major Nintendo video game console and handheld.

Lost Woods

The Lost Woods is a recurring location in the Legend of Zelda series. This mysterious, forested region of Hyrule is typically a maze-like forest that requires one to navigate one’s way through it by a variety of means.

Layla

“Layla” is a song written by Eric Clapton and Jim Gordon, originally released by their blues rock band Derek and the Dominos, as the thirteenth track from their album Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs (November 1970). It’s famously contrasting movements were composed separately by Clapton and Gordon.